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Cosmetic Dentistry to Restore Your Smile

A smile can be the most eye-catching feature of a face. With dentistry's many advances, you no longer have to settle for stained, chipped, or misshapen teeth. You have choices that can help you smile with confidence. Talk to the doctor about the options most suitable for you, what your expectations are, and the dental fees involved.

Teeth Replacement

If you're missing one or more teeth, you may notice a difference in chewing and speaking. A bridge may be used to replace missing teeth, help maintain the shape of your face, and alleviate the stress in your bite.

There are two types of tooth replacement: fixed bridge and implant.

Implant

An implant attaches an artificial, completely life like tooth directly to the jaw under the gum tissue. A small titanium fixture is often used to surgically place the implant in the upper or lower jawbone to replace the root of your missing tooth and provide a strong anchor for the crown. Through the use of Tooth Implants we can restore your smile to its original glory with a completely natural look and feel. We have had great success in revitalizing our patients smiles with this procedure.

Fixed Bridge

A fixed bridge replaces missing teeth with artificial teeth, looks great, and literally bridges the gap where one or more teeth may have been. The restoration can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain or a combination of these materials and is bonded onto surrounding teeth for support.

The success of any bridge or implant depends on its foundation "the other teeth, gums, or bone to which it is attached. So it's very important to keep your remaining teeth, gums, and jaw healthy and strong.

Crowns

A crown covers a tooth and restores it to its normal shape and size. A crown can make your tooth stronger and improve its appearance. It can cover and support a tooth that has a large filling. It can be used to attach a bridge, prevent a weak or brittle tooth from breaking, or restore one that's already broken. A crown is a good way to cover teeth that are discolored, badly shaped, or out of position. Crowns are also used to cover dental implants.

A crown may be made of gold or porcelain. It is made to fit the tooth precisely. It looks somewhat like a thimble and is cemented onto the prepared tooth.

Gold Crowns

A gold crown has several benefits. Like all crowns, it covers and protects your tooth. But in addition, a gold crown is gentle on opposing teeth when you chew Very strong, so it withstands heavy biting forces Durable and long-lasting

Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Crowns

A PFM crown consists of a tooth-colored porcelain layer baked onto a metal core. We might choose a PFM crown to restore a tooth when a large filling has failed, or when the tooth is cracked, broken, or subject to grinding and clenching. a PFM crown has long-lasting durability, an inner metal core that helps the crown withstand heavy biting force, and an outer porcelain layer that can be made to closely match or improve your natural tooth color.

All Porcelain Crowns

Recent breakthroughs in adhesives, combined with the development of stronger porcelain materials, allow us to make crowns entirely out of porcelain. All-porcelain crowns maintain a translucency that makes them hard to tell from natural teeth. Without metal, the problem of a dark line at the edge of the gums is eliminated. This allows us to place the edge of the crown above the gum-line and that's healthier for your tooth and gum.

Extractions

There are times when it is necessary to remove a tooth. Sometimes a baby tooth has long or misshapen roots that prevent it from falling out and the tooth must be removed to make way for the permanent tooth to erupt. At other times, a tooth may have so much decay that it puts the surrounding teeth and jaw at risk of decay, so the doctor may recommend removal and replacement with a bridge or implant. Infection, orthodontic correction, or problems with a wisdom tooth can also require removal of a tooth.

When it is determined that a tooth needs to be removed, the dentist may extract the tooth during a regular checkup or the dentist may request another visit for this procedure. While the procedure is typically very quick, it is important to share any concerns or preferences for sedation that you may have.

Fillings

Advances in modern dental materials and techniques have provided new ways to create more pleasing, natural-looking smiles. As a result, dentists and patients have several choices when it comes to selecting materials used to repair missing, worn, damaged, or decayed teeth

Traditional dental restoratives include gold, porcelain, and composite. The strength and durability of traditional dental materials continue to make them useful for situations where restored teeth must withstand extreme forces that result from chewing, such as in the back of the mouth.

Newer dental restoratives include ceramic and plastic compounds that mimic the appearance of natural teeth. These compounds, often called composite resins, are often used on the front teeth where a natural appearance is important. They can be used on the back teeth as well depending on the location and extent of the tooth decay. Composite resins are usually more costly than the older amalgam fillings.

What's right for me?

Several factors influence the performance, durability, longevity and expense of dental restorations. These factors include: the components used in the filling material; the amount of tooth structure remaining; where and how the filling is placed; the chewing load that the tooth will have to bear; and the length and number of visits needed to prepare and adjust the restored tooth.

With so many choices, how do I know what's right for me?

The ultimate decision about what to use is best determined by the patient in consultation with the dentist. Before your treatment begins, discuss the options with the doctor. To help you prepare for this discussion it is helpful to understand the two basic types of dental restorations: direct and indirect.

Direct restorations are fillings placed immediately into a prepared cavity in a single visit. They include glass ionomers, resin ionomers and composite (resin) fillings. The dentist prepares the tooth, places the filling and adjusts it during one appointment.

Indirect restorations generally require two or more visits. They include inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns and bridges fabricated with gold, base metal alloys, porcelain, ceramics or composites. During the first visit, the dentist prepares the tooth and makes an impression of the area to be restored. The dentist then places a temporary over the prepared tooth. The impression is sent to a dental laboratory, which creates the dental restoration. At the next appointment, the dentist cements the restoration into the prepared cavity and adjusts it as needed.

Root Canal

In the past, if you had a tooth with a diseased nerve, you'd probably lose that tooth. Today, with a special dental procedure called root canal treatment, you may save that tooth. Inside each tooth is the pulp and the nerve. The nerve is the vestige of the tissue that originally formed the tooth. Once the tooth has been in the mouth for a time, the functioning of the nerve is no longer necessary.

When a tooth is cracked or has a deep cavity, bacteria can enter the pulp. Germs can cause an infection inside the tooth. Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip, in the jawbone, forming a "pus-pocket" called an abscess. An abscess can cause the pulp tissue to die. When the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result. Certain byproducts of the infection can injure your jawbones and your overall health. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.

Treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp. Next the pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are cleaned and sealed. Often posterior teeth that have endodontic treatment should have a cast crown placed in order to strengthen the remaining structure. Then as long as you to continue to care for your teeth and gums with regular brushing, flossing, and checkups so that the root(s) of the restored tooth are nourished by the surrounding tissues, your restored tooth can last a lifetime.

Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile!

At Home Whitening

Over time, your teeth darken as minerals penetrate their outer enamel layer. Foods and beverages that stain can cause this darkening. We can prescribe a home whitening system that will safely lighten these stains, giving you a whiter, brighter smile. A specially formulated whitening gel, designed to be highly effective, yet safe, gently forces oxygen through the enamel of your teeth. The process virtually erases stains and brightens your teeth without damaging your tooth enamel or your gums.

First, we thoroughly examine your teeth and your mouth to make sure at home whitening is an appropriate option for you. We then take impressions of your teeth, and use the impressions to make models of your teeth. Using these models, we make a personalized whitening tray that fits tightly over your teeth, allowing us to achieve optimum results.